How Enterprises Can Take Control of Their IoT Connectivity

Ken Briodagh
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Illustration: © IoT For All

Enterprises are often at the mercy of MNO, MVNO, and other connectivity providers to operate their IoT networks. This can lead to unexpected and unavoidable outages, unpredictable data transfer rates, and even security concerns. 

Because of these and other risks and downsides, enterprises are looking at ways to own their own IoT network connectivity. But how?

By partnering and working with an Enterprise Network Operator, or ENO. 

An ENO is a blend of MNO and MVNO that gives the company a certain amount of control and visibility into the network while still offering global connectivity and upgrade options to keep up with changing technology. 

In a recent webinar, called “Own the IoT: The Enterprise Guide to Managed Cellular Networks,” Pod Group outlined the concept of the ENO and illustrated how it works in practice. Enterprise ownership of mobile networks is set to remove some of the barriers that have stifled the growth of the IoT. Technologies like the eSIM, the availability of an unlicensed spectrum for enterprise use, and IP-based network architecture are opening the door to give enterprises control over their IoT connectivity, from the SIM card right up to a private cellular network.

In the webinar, you’ll hear from Pod Group CEO Sam Colley and Félix Ontañón, Director of Research and Development, about how you can take ownership of your private and public networks. Click here to check it out now

Basically, as the connectivity landscape evolves, the control of the network no longer needs to remain with Connectivity Service Provider (CSP). An ENO like Pod Group can now deploy and control the infrastructure and related services that enterprises need to own and control their IoT networks. This gives those enterprises that do not have the in-house capabilities to build, manage, and run their own network the means to do so as a managed service (Network as a service – NaaS).

There are many benefits to enterprises in owning their own networks, including greater visibility into the status of their connected devices, more flexibility and control over the network configuration, QoS and security policies of their IoT network, and the ability to scale globally quickly reduce connectivity costs.

The end goal for enterprises is to own and operate a unified private domain in which their IoT network operates as the corporate LAN. This command and control of the base connectivity can ease all sorts of Digital Transformation strategies while increasing security, reliability, and resiliency. 

For all the details, make sure you check out the Pod Group webinar, “Own the IoT: The Enterprise Guide to Managed Cellular Networks.”

Author
Ken Briodagh
Ken Briodagh - Editorial Director, IoT For All
Ken is Editorial Director at IoT for All. He loves all forms of technology, because he's into fantasy more than sci-fi and even Arthur C Clarke admitted that "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." So, where's that ...
Ken is Editorial Director at IoT for All. He loves all forms of technology, because he's into fantasy more than sci-fi and even Arthur C Clarke admitted that "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." So, where's that ...